Photography

Project

Project: Grain Harvest

In my post ‘Visiting Sea Lake’, I mentioned that the reason for the visit was to work in the grain harvest. Although this was aimed at filling in some time, the primary reason was to learn more about how the grain industry works. The seed was sown during our return trip through the WA wheat belt – where the paddocks of wheat were endless and workers were in short supply. So, this post summarises what I managed to glean from my fellow workers, truck drivers and farmers (and a bit of on-line research).

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Victoria 2021

Visiting: Lake Tyrrell

At long last, after two weeks of waiting in Sea Lake, I started working on Monday at the Sea Lake Grain Flow receiving depot. However, the weather continues to be an influencing factor in my shifts, with two being shortened due to high moisture levels in the grain and today’s being cancelled all together. I spent my waiting time wisely by building up a series of images of Lake Tyrrell and Sea Lake, so in this post, I am pleased to share some of my stories and images of Lake Tyrrell.

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Visiting

Visiting: Sea Lake

Lake Tyrrell Viewing Boardwalk

On returning from our WA2021 trip, I found that settling down into a routine at home rather challenging, due partly to the lack of photographic assignments. So, faced with a few months without any meaningful work, I decided to do something about it and successfully applied for a casual job working in the wheat harvest. For a number of reasons, I chose and am now visiting Sea Lake for an extended period.

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abandoned

Visiting: Ballarto

Ballarto Sawmill 2020

During August 2020, I embarked on an outing to explore the possibilities of photographing the railway station which closed in 1978. Always looking for other opportunities, I spotted a derelict sawmill close by and took the time to go inside for some interesting shots. On visiting Ballarto again this October, I paid the sawmill another visit, with a surprising outcome.

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Current

TAS2020: The photography

The Leven River: Reflections

Please note: this post has been written for photographers and is therefore quite lengthy and does get quite technical

For me, one of the primary objectives of our tour round Tasmania was to develop my skills in photographing subject matter that sits outside my normal genre, the built environment, and to come back with a few images that are worthy of potentially offering as framed photographs for sale and as possible competition entries.…

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Photography

TAS2020: Day 03

Sunset at the Edge of the World – Saturday night

From Day 02 to today the wind was unrelenting and seemed to get stronger as the night wore on. Having had very little, if any, sleep, Kerena and I agreed at 3 o’clock in the morning that we would forgo a further sleepless night of forecasted high winds at Arthur River in preference to heading to Queestown, our next planned stop.

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Photography

TAS2020: All set to go

It was with much relief and excitement that my partner and I heard the announcement last Friday that the Tasmanian border had been opened. Relief, because we had booked the ferry, with fingers crossed, a couple of months in advance, and excitement because of our planned four week circumnavigation around the island state.

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Architecture

Visiting: The Imperial Hotel, Rushworth

In my younger days, I have on the odd occasion fallen asleep in a bar – a few beers and a warm atmosphere can have that effect!

My most recent such experience was much less random when a visit to Rushworth in Regional Victoria included an overnight stay.

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Architecture

Visiting: MONA

Not many people would purposefully visit a museum when it is closed, but I did exactly that during a recent short stay in Hobart.

Of course, the museum is no ordinary museum – it was the Museum of Old and Modern Art – and, actually, I did not have much choice about it being open or not as the only day I could visit was Christmas Day.

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Techniques

Compressing Time

I am sure you have seen those amazing videos of clouds scudding across the skies, of shipping arriving and departing port in no time at all and of buildings being built in as short a time as 5 minutes. And you will no doubt realise that these are created from a series of individual photographs taken at intervals over the duration of the project or activity.

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